Youth in Cebu Learn about Permaculture, Sustainable Recovery and Development


In April 2014, the Bayanihan Foundation board member James Castillo led the Environmental Youth Camp for Sustainability. One of the major sessions of the youth camp was talking about permaculture and the possibilities of sustainable and holistic development in Cebu, Philippines. Here are the excerpts of his training session and his view points in developing permaculture and sustainable development in Cebu:

What is permaculture? (photo courtesy of solraya.blogspot.com)

What is permaculture? (photo courtesy of solraya.blogspot.com)

What is permaculture? Permaculture is a branch of ecological design, ecological engineering, environmental design, construction and Integrated Water Resources Management that develops sustainable architecture, regenerative and self-maintained habitat and agricultural systems modeled from natural ecosystems.[1][2] The term permaculture (as a systematic method) was first coined by Australians Bill Mollison and David Holmgren in 1978. The word permaculture originally referred to “permanent agriculture” [3] but was expanded to stand also for “permanent culture,” as it was seen that social aspects were integral to a truly sustainable system as inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka‘s natural farming philosophy (Wikipedia 2014).

Youth participants in Cebu, Philippines learning about permaculture

Youth participants in Cebu, Philippines learning about permaculture

Throughout the camp in Cebu I was teaching the youth about permaculture. We looked into what permaculture is and how this simple yet radical approach could end poverty in the Philippines. I based the discussion on experience of the participants and explored some of the ongoing campaigns related to permaculture like the bases cleanup campaign in Clark and Subic, Philippines.  I helped the youth understand the different elements of this radical approach to landscape and agriculture. We explored its elements, principles and ethics and topics related to permaculture like soil, water, earthworks, trees, climate, aquaculture and aquaponics and alternative community setups.  With the help of the youth camp leaders,  we created together a permaculture design sketch for the community. I helped them see the long term rehabilitation of the land as well as the long term relationships among the community that lives around there, including the  environmental youth camp participants themselves.

James Castillo (second from right) hands out certificates of participation to youth attending Permaculture workshop

James Castillo (second from right) hands out certificates of participation to youth attending the Permaculture workshop

I inspired the youth to look forward to the idea of a potential development project in permaculture, the Kalambuan Holistic Development Project. This project is now in its planning stages that will put people and nature at the center of the design. This will be a project in Cebu with potential international participation, where volunteers and sponsors are welcome to help build the infrastructure to create this new model in this part of the world. We would need help from engineers, biologists, architects, sociologists, social workers, scientists, teachers, researchers, farmers, artists and other professionals to create systems as part of the Kalambuan Project.  This holistic project will eventually address all the needs of the people in this community and will make sure that children’s needs are met.  We need to carry forward this new vision to truly create a sustainable design where we are empowering the youth to create an abundant, sustainable and holistic world. I will be sharing more about this in the coming months, so stay tuned!

Youth participants planting mangrove trees in Northern Cebu, Philippines

Youth participants planting mangrove trees in Northern Cebu, Philippines

Here’s a related Ted Talk segment that describes this encompassing view-point of permaculture and sustainable holistic development:

Posted in Diaspora Giving, Disaster Relief, Environmental conservation, environmental sustainability, Philippine poverty, Philippines, Typhoon Haiyan, Youth leadership development | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Youth, Arts, Environment and Sustainable Recovery After Typhoon Haiyan


In April 2014, the Bayanihan Foundation board member James Castillo traveled to Cebu, Philippines and led the Environmental Youth Camp for Sustainability. The following blog entry is his personal insight and experience of that wonderful trip:

Participants of the 2014 Environmental Youth Camp, Cebu, Philippines

Participants of the 2014 Environmental Youth Camp, Cebu, Philippines

For the past 4 years, the Bayanihan Foundation Worldwide has supported the Environmental Youth Camp in Cebu. Each year a new generation of environmental volunteers are born. But this year’s camp is very important. The camp gathered 30 youth participants from different parts of Visayas, the region in the Philippines hit hard by Typhoon Haiyan.

Food Distribution, Cebu, Philippines

Food Distribution, Cebu, Philippines

On the second day of the camp the youth participants participated in the relief distribution of goods to the victims of Typhoon Haiyan in Northern Cebu. Together with the 30 youth participants were members of the local youth organization, UYCO (uma youth christian organization).

Youth participants planting mangrove trees in Northern Cebu, Philippines

Youth participants planting mangrove trees in Northern Cebu, Philippines

Youth participants plant mangrove trees in Northern Cebu, Philippines.

Youth participate in song writing for environmental sustainability workshop

Youth take part in song writing for environmental sustainability workshop

Song writing workshop in the midst of a sugarcane plantation.

Youth participants join in song writing workshop

Youth participants join in song writing workshop

Filmmaking workshop participants busy drafting their scripts about their experiences with the 7.2 earthquake in Bohol and Typhoon Haiyan and Theater workshop participants at the first critiquing session.  Afterwards, filmmaking workshop participants are given awards for their scripts during the awards night part of the Solidarity Night.  Participants also gave a speech after receiving the best animated feature award. Daniel Uy, writer of The Flower talked about the community’s need to help restore the environment.

James Castillo (standing center) leads youth in a film making workshop

James Castillo (standing center) leads youth in a film making workshop

Song writing participants showcasing their original composition about saving the environment to the community.
James Castillo leading group in a song writing for environmental sustainablity workshop

Bayanihan Board member James Castillo together with representatives from VDRN (Visayas Disaster Response Network), VMPRDC (Visayas Mindanao People’s Resource Development Center) and CONCERN (Center for Emergency Aid and Rehabilitation, Inc.) presented a Certificate of Appreciation to the Mayor of Medellin, Cebu for supporting the 2014 camp.

Group photo environmental sustainability workshop in Cebu, Philippines

Group photo environmental sustainability workshop in Cebu, Philippines

During the last and fifth day of the camp,  youth participants decide to continue what they have learned and formed the Natura youth group. They will put together a project proposal to carry out a Permaculture project at one of the urban poor communities in Cebu City. This is the first camp that the organizers, volunteers and participants learned about permaculture or Permanent Agriculture, a new model at looking at Nature and Development. A vision that works with nature and not against it. The goal of Permaculture is to create holistic and self-sustaining communities that address all the basic needs of people while making nature more abundant. The Philippines is a tropical country. It makes no sense why millions of Filipinos go without proper food and water every day. The 2014 Environmental Youth Campers together with concerned people nationally and internationally will start the long process of sustainable recovery for Filipinos. Out of the destruction and chaos of Typhoon Haiyan, grassroots communities in Cebu and other devastated islands will rise like a Phoenix, a symbol that will show the world that we can still make that vision of a sustainable future a reality.

Posted in Diaspora Giving, Disaster Relief, environmental sustainability, philanthropy, Philippines, Poverty | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Filipino Amerasians, America’s Forgotten Children, Celebrated 4th of July


Members of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) celebrate 4th of July 2014

Members of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) celebrate 4th of July 2014 at SM City Clark Mall Angeles City, Philippines

Members of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) celebrate 4th of July 2014

Members of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) celebrate 4th of July 2014

Members of the United Philippine Amerasians dancing and performing at SM City Clark Mall, Angeles City, Philippines

Members of the United Philippine Amerasians dancing and performing at SM City Clark Mall, Angeles City, Philippines

Mark Gilbore, member of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA)

Mark Gilbore, member of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA)

On July 4, 2014, the Bayanihan Foundation sponsored the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) 4th of July celebration at SM City Clark Mall in Angeles City, Philippines.  In 2012, the Bayanihan Foundation co-sponsored with WedPro, the formation of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA), a group of young Filipino Amerasians that recognized their contributions to Filipino and American societies.  The UPA hopes to increase the public’s awareness of Filipino Amerasian issues, challenges, ideals and successes. There are more than 50,000 Amerasians left behind; they are America’s forgotten children.  Three years ago, the Bayanihan Foundation partnered with WeDpro and Buklod, nongovernmental organizations (NGO)s in the Philippines to support the Filipino Amerasian community leaders and the creation of the UPA. In 2014, I am proud to share that the Bayanihan Foundation continues to support these young Amerasian women and men in supporting their Fourth of July activities and celebration, as they are Americans as well. I have included below a personal excerpt from Ms. Tin Jackson, United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) Event Organizer. She shares her personal insights into organizing the 4th of July 2014 event:

Organizer Ms. Tin Jackson (standing far right) interviews presenters at 4th of July celebration 2014

Organizer Ms. Tin Jackson (standing far right) interviews presenters at 4th of July celebration 2014

“I started at United Philippine Amerasians (UPA) last July 2012. We formed the group together with my fellow Amerasians and with the support of WEDPRO and the Bayanihan Foundation. The group just celebrated its third anniversary this year.  I’m glad that the members are still active; we even have new Amerasian members. It’s important that we are celebrate the Fourth of July, the US Independence Day.  This is an opportunity to tell everyone that we are not just souvenir babies or G.I babies. We are also Americans. At the same time, we are productive citizens of the Philippines.  We are moving forward.

I implore everyone that participated in our Fourth of July activity to join us in our advocacy that we as Filipino Amerasians should be recognized by the US government like all the Amerasians from other countries. The world should know who we really are. We should not be cast aside.  Many of us feel lonely; many are searching for their American fathers.  Thousands of other Filipino Amerasians visit our Facebook page and are curious on how to become part of the UPA group. Many Filipino Amerasians are inquiring on how to they could file an US citizenship or a visa to travel to the US. However, we all know that we Filipino Amerasians were cast aside and were not given that legal recognition like other Amerasians around the world.”

Posted in Amerasians, Diaspora Giving, justice, philanthropy, Philippines, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Filipino Amerasians in Clark and Subic, Philippines Celebrate the Fourth of July


On the Fourth of July 2014, the Bayanihan Foundation is proud to support the activities of the United Philippine Amerasians (UPA), a group of young Filipino Amerasians that recognized their contributions to Filipino and American societies.  The UPA hopes to increase the public’s awareness of Filipino Amerasian issues, challenges, ideals and successes. There are more than 50,000 Amerasians left behind; they are America’s forgotten children.  Three years ago, the Bayanihan Foundation partnered with WeDpro and Buklod, nongovernmental organizations (NGO)s in the Philippines to support the Filipino Amerasian community leaders and the creation of the UPA. In 2014, I am proud to share that the Bayanihan Foundation continues to support these young Amerasian women and men in supporting their Fourth of July activities and celebration, as they are Americans as well.

When the US military bases in the Philippines closed in 1992, the military left behind thousands of Amerasian children. Since the closing of these military installations, American presence still exists and contrary to first estimate of 52,000.  In April 2014, President Obama’s recent visit to the Philippines and the new deal over US army bases reopening, also opened up the painful past for many of these ‘Amerasians’ (Al Jazeera: April 2014).  Many of these young Filipino Amerasians continue to live in abject poverty, forcing them to continue the cycle of marginalized subsistence.

In June 2010, ABC News George Stephanopoulos reported the successful reunion story of one Filipino Amerasian, Barry Bogert Jr. But what about the other 49,999 other Filipino Amerasians left behind? They are still looking for their parents; they are America’s forgotten children.  In 1992, the United States military left the Philippines. I thought they took everything with them. But they left behind at least 50,000 Amerasian children whose fathers were American sailors and their mothers were assumed to be prostitutes. Amerasians have long been a marginalized sector in the Philippines, due to the lack of recognition and support from the government and the continuing discrimination and stigma that they get from their community.

So in July 2014, I was glad that Ms. Tin Jackson, one of the young Filipino Amerasian organizers of the UPA reached out to me and the Bayanihan Foundation. She told me that they would like to hold their 4th of July celebration and conduct some strategic planning with other Filipino Amerasians to increase awareness of their plight.   A big thanks to the donors of the Bayanihan Foundation including Barbara Hall who wanted to help these Filipino Amerasians and bring this important issue to the forefront.

So as many Americans in the US celebrate the Fourth of July weekend cooking hotdogs, grilling hamburgers and enjoying the fireworks celebration, do not forget the 50,000 Filipino Amerasians left behind in the Philippines. They are also Americans celebrating the Fourth of July halfway across the world in the Philippines.  They  deserve to be recognized as both Filipino and American. It’s about time they shed the stigma of being America’s forgotten children.

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My Personal Experience Visiting the Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan


Mr. Arman Mulleem is the Executive Vice President of the Worldwide Filipino Alliance (WFA), a worldwide alliance of Filipinos around the world. In November 2013, Arman recently returned from his work stint in Saudi Arabia, joined Evelyn Castillo of the Bayanihan Foundation Worldwide in visiting Leyte and Samar, two weeks after the devastating typhoon Haiyan hit landfall.  Arman shares his personal experience and first hand account visiting the Philippines right after typhoon Haiyan.

(center, stripe shirt) Arman Mulleem of Worldwide Filipino Alliance distributing relief goods

(center, stripe shirt) Arman Mulleem of Worldwide Filipino Alliance distributing relief goods

My name is Arman Mulleem. I  consider myself a “do-gooder” par excellence. I have lived and working in Saudi Arabia for many years as an overseas worker. I also have been very active with the Worldwide Filipino Alliance (WFA), a worldwide alliance of Filipinos around the world that promotes and supports Filipinos in the diaspora. When Evelyn Castillo of the Bayanihan Foundation Worldwide invited me to join the foundation’s efforts in providing emergency food relief, I did not think twice and booked my ticket to Tacloban, Leyte to help.

Devastated Tacloban City airport right after Typhoon Haiyan hit landfall

Devastated Tacloban City airport right after Typhoon Haiyan hit landfall

From the air looking out of the window of my Philippine Airlines Express flight, Tacloban Airport (or what used to be) looked more like a picture of a bombed-out structure from an old World War II movie.  As I walked from the plan towards the arrivals area, the sense of gloom was unmistakable.  A couple of US Air Force C-130 planes have just unloaded tons of US-AID marked crates, while another cargo plane from Australia was waiting for its turn to unload its cargo.

At the baggage claim area, airport and military personnel deserved commendation for maintaining order in an otherwise primitive situation when everything had to be done without any working machines and technological support.

Dale Asis, Executive Director of the Bayanihan Foundation, Evelyn Castillo and Ana Hastreiter, a volunteer from Munich, Germany were already waiting for me in the parking area.  Less than a kilometer from the airport, our nostrils were greeted by a kind of stench that defies the description.  A few body bags have yet to be picked up besides the mounds of debris but we think the offensive odor came from the human and animal remains underneath the piles of concrete, steel, wood and garbage that the Philippine Department of Public Works working round the clock – have yet to clear up.  It seemed like that Tacloban looked like a bigger version of a garbage dump site and the residents almost seemed immune to the permeating stench that the people just ignored.

San Juanico Bridge connecting Samar and Leyte islands

San Juanico Bridge connecting Samar and Leyte islands

As we exit the city and head towards the island of Samar, I saw the San Juanico Bridge, an engineering marvel. The bridge was hardly damaged, a welcome relief from the unimaginable destruction that was Tacloban City.  However, immediately after crossing the bridge, we were back to reality. Coconut trees were uprooted; houses and buildings were without roofs and walls; many were toppled to the ground while others were simply blown away – Devastation with a big “D”.

Devastated countryside after Typhoon Haiyan

Devastated countryside after Typhoon Haiyan

The sight of almost wiped out coastal communities numbs the senses. Cars and vans were piled one on top of the other.  Evelyn pointed out the caves jutting out to the sea and that people took refuge there.  More than a thousand people found shelter in the caves and survived. However, their homes did not. My mouth was wide open as I saw the devastation around me. I said to myself, “How could a God-fearing and peaceful people be subjected to a trial of such gigantic proportion? What have they done to Mother Nature to punish them in this way?”

It was almost dusk when we reached Giporlos, Eastern Samar. The volunteer doctors of the Medical Action Group were already there and Evelyn’s nephews and nieces welcomed us all. We started sorting the medicines and supplies we brought but by 10 pm the electric generator ran out of fuel and so we just called it a day. Except for Dale who slept soundly, the rest of the group remained listless all night. I think we were kept awake by the images of massive destruction that we saw.

Rainbow over the devastated Giporlos Fish Market

Rainbow over the devastated Giporlos Fish Market

The next morning, a beautiful rainbow greeted us. Even sound sleeper Dale was ecstatic at the sight of the rainbow and immediately took pictures. Dale was also the first to visit the washed-up fishing pier where fishermen unloaded their catch to be sold in the nearby fish market.  Taking a short stroll from the pier, I walked toward the municipal hall. I saw the twisted metal of the former municipal grand stand. The hall’s windows were broken; it was a shamble of steel and concrete.  A giant tree fell on the fire station’s building and ambulance parked beside it was damaged beyond repair.

Volunteer doctors from Medical Action Group provided much needed medical care

Volunteer doctors from Medical Action Group provided much-needed medical care

Right after breakfast, we conducted the medical mission with volunteer medical staff from the Medical Action Group (MAG). We conducted the medical mission in front of the parish priest’s residence besides the Catholic church.  At the same time, a team of medical staff from the Philippine Dept. of Health also helped us along the way.  The volunteers worked non-stop with nary a break. After treating the last of some 300 patients, the group packed up. Hungry and tired but happy for being able to help and serve. The group finally decided to have lunch at 4 pm that afternoon. We just stretched our legs and relaxed for an hour and the group was ready to go to the next mission in the next town, Guian, the town where the super typhoon Haiyan first hit landfall.

Evelyn Castillo (far left) conducting a meeting with local fisherfolk in Giporlos, Samar

Evelyn Castillo (far left) conducting a meeting with local fisherfolk in Giporlos, Samar

On my second day, Evelyn conducted a meeting with local fisherfolk from nearby villages near Giporlos and Guian, Samar. She presided the meeting in the native language, Waray, interspersed with English for the benefit of us who did not understand the dialect.  She gave me the floor to explain my proposal for the Worldwide Filipino Alliance (WFA). Using the boat-for-livelihood as an example, I explained to them how my colleagues from WFA intend to help their respective barangays (villages), putting emphasis on the fact that we cannot help them all at the same time, and that the assistance will not be handout but a ‘soft’ loan with a small interest.  The idea was to imbue the fisher folk with a sense of responsibility.  Those from the coastal barangays were receptive to the idea, while those from the hills whose main source of income was from coconut farming have some reservations.  There is a tremendous need for massive replanting of fast growing coconuts.  But even the fastest growing coconut varieties will take years to bear fruit.  Farmers and fishermen were not the only ones adversely affected by the typhoon. Craftsmen and artisans whose main source of income depended on electric power were also severely affected. There was no electricity the entire time we were in Samar and they’re predicting months before electric power will be restored.

Evelyn Castillo (standing right) looking over her home without a roof

Evelyn Castillo (standing right) looking over her home without a roof

On my third day, I visited Evelyn Castillo’s devastated home.  Roofless and windowless, i would need major repair before it becomes livable again.  She told Dale and me that the strong winds lifted her refrigerator and her air conditioner from the second floor of her home and landed about 50 meters away.

(center, stripe shirt) Arman Mulleem of Worldwide Filipino Alliance distributing relief goods

(center, stripe shirt) Arman Mulleem of Worldwide Filipino Alliance distributing relief goods

That same afternoon, we resumed our distribution of relief goods in a barangay (village) outside the town proper. The smile on the faces of the typhoon victims were truly heartwarming.  Soon after, we went back to Giporlos and I immediately gathered my belongings. I decided to take my chances and fly with the Philippine C-130 cargo plane from Guian, Samar back to Manila.  After unloading its cargo, the Philippine military authorities would usually let civilians join the return flight of the cargo plane back to the capital. I said that I would take my chances and try to get into the plane. When I told Evelyn and Dale, they seemed worried about me. They raised a lot of questions, “What if there will be no plane tomorrow? What if they would not let you in? What if …?”

“I would take my chances,” I insisted.

(standing left) Arman signing up to join the Philippine C-130 cargo plane to Manila

(standing left) Arman signing up to join the Philippine C-130 cargo plane to Manila

On my fourth and last day, the morning air was cold and heavy rain clouds were threatening in the horizon.  By 7 am, the queue to join the Philippine c-130 cargo plan was already long but still I managed to sign the logbook.  A half hour later, the much awaited Philippine c-130 cargo plan arrived and one hour later we arrived at the Philippine Villamor Air Base. We were driven to the military grandstand where volunteers were saluted and given a warm welcome by the military. They even provided us a warm lunch of rice, chicken adobo (Filipino curry) and sautéed string beans.  One of the military volunteers asked me how I survived the typhoon. I told her that I was not a survivor but I was a volunteer helping out in a mission with the Bayanihan Foundation and the Medical Action Group (MAG). She was impressed by my volunteer spirit and she promised me to treat me to a nice lunch or dinner for my volunteer efforts.

Posted in Diaspora Donors, Diaspora Giving, Disaster Relief, Environmental conservation, Philippine poverty, Philippines, Typhoon Haiyan, Volunteerism | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Stay With the Philippines” – Recovery Efforts after Typhoon Haiyan


Evelyn Castillo is the Bayanihan Foundation’s Liaison in the Philippines. Evelyn is a certified public health nurse and has more than 30 years experience in project development and management, community organizing and public health services.  She has worked with many international governmental organizations (NGOs) including the Philippine Canadian Human Resource Development Foundation. Evelyn was born and grew up in Giporlos, Samar, one of the devastated towns hit by Typhoon Haiyan.  Evelyn and her family suffered tremendously from the effects of the super typhoon. Evelyn wrote this blog entry to share the latest news on the ground and the foundation’s efforts in recovery and rehabilitation efforts.  Evelyn is also encouraging everyone to continue being engaged with the Philippines.

“On behalf of all the people of Giporlos and other nearby towns in Samar, I thank you for  your support and good wishes during these trying times as we recover from  the devastating Typhoon Haiyan. Thank you to all those who donated to the Bayanihan Foundation and have sent their financial support.  My hometown Giporlos, Samar was one of the towns hit hard by the super typhoon. My family and the 13,000 residents of Giporlos are slowly recovering but many are still struggling from the devastation.  Many families have planted rice and vegetables. Some farmers started planting root crops like cassava and yams in the outer barangay (villages).  Others are even harvesting their vegetables now.

(left to right): (standing left) fisherman receiving fishing net provided as a microloan from Dale Asis (center) and Evelyn Castillo (standing right)

(left to right): (standing left) fisherman receiving fishing net provided as a microloan from the Worldwide Filipino Alliance. Also in the photo: Dale Asis (center) and Evelyn Castillo (standing right)

Besides farming, many residents of Giporlos, Samar rely on fishing for their livelihood.  I am working in partnership with the Worldwide Filipino Alliance (WFA), an Internet-based group organized by Filipinos overseas and in the homeland who wished to assist in the development efforts in the Philippines. WFA members donated funds to buy fishing nets and we distributed them to fisher folk in Giporlos, Samar as a form of micro-loan enterprise.

Besides assistance from the WFA, many fisher folk have taken advantage of assistance from the Philippine government and other international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as well.  The International Red Cross distributed 10,000 Philippine pesos in cash assistance to some fisher folk but they also had limited means and only a few fisher folk families per barangay received the cash assistance.  The Philippine Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) distributed plywood, epoxy, paint and motors for fishing boats to some fisher folk in the area.  However, only a selected few have been given so far.  The Health Futures Foundation, headed by Dr. Jaime Galvez Tan distributed 43 fiberglass boats to fisher folk communities and they are planning to also distribute fish nets free to another group of fisherfolk community. I have helped the Health Futures Foundation to find the poor fisher folk who really needed the assistance, especially those who missed out and did not take advantage of the relief efforts provided by the government and other NGOs.

Evelyn Castillo (standing second from left) and Dale Asis (center) holds machete (bolo) to be distributed to farmers in Giporlos, Samar

Evelyn Castillo (standing second from left) and Dale Asis (center) holds machete (bolo) to be distributed to farmers in Giporlos, Samar

For farmers, the Bayanihan Foundation distributed bolo (sharp knives) and itak (machetes) to selected farmers that farm in far away villages. The foundation also provided them with rice and essential food packs. The relief food packs was given to over 2,000 households in  four barangay (villages). Besides the Bayanihan Foundation, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) distributed metal roofing sheets to homeowners to help them rebuild their homes. However, the distribution was uneven among the barangay and it resulted in some chaos.  Moreover since February 2014,  the Philippine government  stopped providing relief goods and only a smattering of international NGOs are still provided emergency food relief. Without assistance from the Bayanihan Foundation and other NGOs, I could not imagine how my family and other residents of  Giporlos, Samar would have survived.  Now more than ever we need you to continue to stay with the Philippines and be engaged.

Evelyn Castillo (center) conducting seminar and discussion with fisher folk community of Giporlos, Samar

Evelyn Castillo (center) conducting seminar and discussion with fisher folk community of Giporlos, Samar

So what’s next for the Bayanihan Foundation rehabilitation relief efforts? The foundation would like to provide small micro-loans of $15 dollars to fisher folk families so they could buy a low-cost scale, a styrofoam cooler and some plastic bags and start selling fish and make a living for themselves. Your $15 donation will give a gift of sustainable livelihood to one family in Giporlos, Samar. The Bayanihan Foundation would need these fisher folk to pay back these micro loans so the funds could be circulated and help another fisher folk family.   Besides the micro-loans for fisher folk, the Bayanihan Foundation is also exploring building latrines for proper sanitation and long-term infrastructure and sustainability in Giporlos, Samar and other nearby towns.  We still need your help. Please stay with the Philippines. Help us recover so we could stand again proudly on our two feet.  Thank you.”

Evelyn Castillo

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After Typhoon Haiyan – Bayanihan Foundation’s Recovery Efforts in the Philippines


After Typhoon Haiyan - Bayanihan Foundation's Recovery Efforts in the Philippines

Dale Asis of the Bayanihan Foundation poses in front a newly repainted fishing boat, a symbol of hope and renewal of Giporlos, Samar, Philippines as the town bounces back from the devastating typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever recorded in history to hit landfall.

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